Going Beyond Historical Data for Forecast Accuracy

Our focus in this blog series has been to establish forecast accuracy targets. In very general terms, the goal should be to add value to the business through the forecasting process. We have however focused on the forecast value add and using that to create a minimum acceptable forecast accuracy target in the previous blog. Now we will take that a step further and talk of ways of improving it.

The Ongoing Shipping Container Shortage and Possible Effects on Tomorrow’s Supply Chain

We have all seen it in the news. Covid-19 outbreaks, labor shortages at the port as well as in trucking, and port delays coupled with high demand from consumers are causing major supply chain issues. Shipping containers are in short supply, or perhaps a better way to say it is that they are waiting to be unloaded or loaded resulting in a shortage. In this blog, let us try to enlist some possible future impacts of this situation. Let us look at it from the perspectives of the different players in the supply chain.

What is Happening to Our Supply Chains?

Everyone is talking about supply chains these days. Ever worsening weather, a global pandemic, and a labor shortage have generated a perfect storm that has pushed global supply chains to their breaking point. I propose that the problem has been building for some time and this perfect storm may just be the reset we need.

Relationship Between Forecast Accuracy and Safety Stocks

A company’s total inventory is built up of many different parts such as strategic stock, anticipation stock, safety stock, cycle stock, unplanned stock. The cycle stock is the one most connected to the demand forecast; it is expected to be sold as the forecast becomes real demand. Safety stock on the other hand is extra stock to deal with the variability of the demand or supply. As such, it is not always linked to forecasting accuracy.

How Forecastable is Your Data?

Having access to an accurate forecast is very beneficial for businesses. If used correctly, it can provide better margins, increase market shares, and many other positive results. At a more tactical level, it can help reduce the costs associated with meeting the customer demand and make the supply chain more efficient.

Classical Supply Chain Management Confronts its Quantum Revolution – the Path to Rapid Intelligent Response (RIR)

COVID-19 direct and ancillary events have made clear that uncertainty is an inherent part of the demand-supply network structure. Every firm, on a regular basis, faces “risk situations" such as manufacturing excursion, unexpected new demand or loss of demand, component supplier interruption, etc. This has placed risk management and rapid intelligent response (RIR) front and center in SCM discussions.

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