How to Determine the Best-Fit Plan with Supply Chain Optimization

The use of optimization in supply chain management is widespread, just not in supply planning.  Regular use of optimization occurs in inventory management and demand forecasting. “Best-fit straight line” is one of the most common uses of optimization. With this method, you enter or pull into Excel (or your favorite statistics software) a set of “x values” (the independent value e.g. the number of cars in a train) and a set of “y values” (dependent value e.g. the fuel cost for each train), click a few buttons and you get a “best-fit” straight line – a slope (b1), a y-intercept (b0), a measure of goodness, and a straight line drawn through your scatter plot.

By |2019-04-13T23:09:19-04:00November 7th, 2017|Supply Chain Optimization|0 Comments

Using Descriptive Analytics to Improve Supply Chain Visibility for Variability, Velocity, Volume, and Variety.

In this guest blog series titled: “Memoirs of a Black Belt,” Stephen Boyd a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt and 30-year supply chain veteran, shares his insights on achieving higher levels of performance using data from existing systems. All opinions expressed in guest authors may not reflect Arkieva’s view on the subject.

By |2019-04-13T23:09:20-04:00September 25th, 2017|Memoirs of a Black Belt, Supply Chain|3 Comments

What Role Will Artificial Intelligence Play in Supply Chain Management?

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been making its rounds in world news for the last few years. With considerable advancements in the field, the concept of AI has garnered its share of fans and critics alike. While many believe AI is the next step in the industrial revolution with its potential for complete automation and an

By |2019-04-13T23:09:20-04:00August 28th, 2017|News and Trends, Supply Chain|1 Comment

Optimization Puzzle: Who’s Guilty? Dormouse, March Hare or Mad Hatter?

In my role as the Director of Analytics, I enjoy working with the Arkieva team and our clients, in building optimization models which help organizations make intelligent decisions with regards to meeting demand, capacity allocation, inventory levels, factory schedules, forecasting, and cancer research. These models are built using a variety of mathematical methods including Boolean

By |2019-04-13T23:09:21-04:00August 16th, 2017|Supply Chain Optimization|0 Comments

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